SDCC 2015 – Geoff Johns Announces ‘Justice League: Gods and Men’

 

Justice League - Gods and Men
Image belongs to DC Comics

Geoff Johns will be leading the new series Justice League: Gods and Men.

The series will be a six-part mini-series that focuses on the aftermath of the current arc “Darkseid War.”

Each issue will focus on the personal issues of a specific character after the war between Darkseid and Anti-Monitor.

The characters who will have a focus are: Batman, Superman, Green Lantern, The Flash, Shazam!, and Lex Luthor.

Lex Luthor’s story seems very interesting; he is still evil and tries to get Darkseid’s power, but he also may be the only one to stop Superman when the Man of Steel gets god-like strength.

The first issue will be out October of this year, but there is no word on creative teams.

Source: CBR

SDCC 2015 – Milestone Media Coming Back to DC Comics

Static
Image belongs to DC Comics and Milestone Media

Milestone Media, the company who brought you Static, Icon, and Xombi (and a myriad of other titles) is teaming back up with DC to bring back beloved characters in the DC Multiverse “Earth-M.”

Creators of the new Milestone publications will include Milestone co-founder Denys Cowan, Milestone 2.0 partner Reginald Hudlin, DC Chief Creative Officer Geoff Johns,and DC Co-Publisher Jim Lee.

Milestone co-founder Derek T. Dingle said, “We have to keep this company alive. We have to maintain diversity in this industry.”

“Earth-M” stories will be told in two graphic novels a year, plus mini-series, and one-shots. Milestone did not confirm any titles or release dates.

Milestone Media started in 1993 with co-founders Dwayne McDuffie, Denys Cowan, Michael Davis, and Derek T. Dingle. They were known for creating under-represented characters in the comic book world, and their amazing agreement with DC to publish under their name, but retain full creative control.

Stay tuned for more news pertaining to Milestone and Earth-M.

Source: CBR

SDCC 2015 – Ben Affleck and Geoff Johns to Co-Write a Stand-Alone Batman Film

Not surprisingly, this big news was dropped over Comic-Con weekend. Surprisingly, it wasn’t announced at Comic-Con.

Ben Affleck and Geoff Johns will be teaming up to write a stand-alone Batman movie, focusing on the aftermath of the events of Batman v. Superman and how they effected the Dark Knight.

Reportedly, the script is nearly finished and will be complete by summer’s end.

As of now, it looks like this is the movie that is taking top priority at DC Entertainment and Warner Brothers.

Geoff Johns is an acclaimed comic book writer. He is known for his work on comic series like The Flash, Green Lantern, Hawkman, and Aquaman.

Ben Affleck, whose fame and acclaim has been reenergized since Argo (F*ck Yourself), is a great writer in his own right. His best works include Good Will Hunting, Gone, Baby Gone, and The Town.

When I first heard this news, I was a little skeptical because I just thought Affleck was monopolizing on the character. But then I remembered that Ben Affleck is famous in part due to his writing skills, so I am really looking forward to this movie.

Batman v. Superman premieres March 25, 2016, followed by Justice League in 2017. The untitled Batman flick probably won’t be out until 2018 or beyond

Source: Deadline

Throne of Atlantis Review

throne of atlantis 5

Source MaterialJustice League #15-17, Aquaman #14-16 (2012-2013)

Original Creative Team: Geoff Johns (writer), Ivan Reis (penciller for Justice League), Paul Pelletier (penciller on Aquaman)

Movie Creative Team: Directed by Ethan Spaulding (Avatar: The Last Airbender, The Legend of Korra)

 

With a strong, unassuming name like Justice League: Throne of Atlantis, you would never guess that this was an Aquaman movie, right? Cringe! Poor Aquaman; after years of riding seahorses and chumming it up with the bottom-feeders, it has become a priority of DC Comics’ head-honcho and Justice League writer Geoff Johns to legitimize the Atlantean.  Adapted from the third story arc in the New52 Justice League series, Throne of Atlantis is a serviceable version of the story that really gave Arthur Curry his mainstream love. However, the DC Animated team really plays it safe by relying on the entire cast to tell the story.

throne of atlantis 2

In itself, that is not a bad quality. I love that there are several different stories building up. It has been some time since the events of Darkseid’s defeat in Justice League: War transpired, and there was plenty of source material to feed into this new movie. Aside from Aquaman, who was noticeably absent from War, the story focused on: Superman and Wonder Woman’s newly kindled relationship, Cyborg’s acceptance of his new body, and a whole lot of Ocean Master (Aquaman’s brother, Orm) and Black Manta. All interesting storylines in their own right but seem to take too much attention from a movie that is supposed to be centered on Aquaman, which is a shame, because as a character, Arthur Curry is a lot of fun to watch.  This version of our Aquaman is completely oblivious to his Atlantean pedigree. He meets his future wife Mera and dons his traditional armor for the first time. So, for a story that is essentially Aquaman’s origin story, neatly tied in a bow, it really shoots itself in the foot – repeatedly.

throne of atlantis 4

Let’s be honest – kids don’t read Aquaman by the masses. This film was supposed to be the introduction of Arthur Curry to a new generation of children, but holds itself back from being successful at that. The feature is littered with curse words and is just as brutal as Flashpoint Paradox – that may be attributed to director Ethan Spaulding, who contributed to great American anime Avatar: The Last Airbender (and Korra, too). Honestly, the fight scenes in Atlantis are some of the best I’ve seen in any DC Animated feature. At the same time, though, there are scenes in the movie that take you out of the moment by being too corny. It made it difficult to tell who the target demographic really was for this movie.

throne of atlantis 6

The movie isn’t all bad, no sir. The voice cast that DC Animated puts together gets more and more impressive each time. The core team from War is back, with Matt Lanter (Aquaman) and Samuel Witwer (Ocean Master), who coincidentally – or not so coincidentally – voiced Anakin Skywalker and Darth Maul from Star Wars: Clone, respectively, rounding out the already stellar cast. Other nerdoms represented here are Harry Lennix (Dollhouse’s Boyd Langton) as Black Manta and Cedric Yarbrough (The Boondocks’ Tom DuBois. The team has only been together for one movie, and there is already great chemistry. One of the best and most natural scenes was when Nathan Fillion’s Green Lantern gets braggadocios with Jason O’Mara’s Batman, capturing the bad guys without thinking the plan through. It embodied the entire state of the Super Seven, I mean Justice League, up to that point. There are also a couple neat Easter Eggs in there that, ahem, “Steel” the show. I slay myself.

throne of atlantis 3

One of the biggest risks Throne of Atlantis takes is toying with Aquaman canon. While War was tweeked just enough to mix things up, Atlantis was completely upheaved in the interest of re-introducing Aquaman to those who had not read about him in the comic books. In the long run, it pays off. Everything is tied up in a neat little bow, and Aquaman somehow becomes the hero. In many ways, it’s just too convenient to be believable. A lot of that is accredited to the fact that Aquaman feels like a side character in his own movie. That’s not to say that the movie is unenjoyable; I thought it was a very enjoyable watch, and the fight scenes here were even better than Son of Batman. However, a lot of the authenticity that made Aquaman an enjoyable character – no, seriously, is parodied even further by the movie’s lack of depth. We all know that Aquaman is nowhere near as cool as Batman, but if you’re going to have the balls to do an Aquaman movie, there’s no half-assing it.

 
SCORECARD:
Category Explanation Score
Plot Team effort makes for an adequate mish-mash of an Aquaman origin. 7/10
Voice-acting The cast is as strong as ever, and newcomers only improve upon that.. 9/10
Representation of Source Material I don’t know this story. Is it even an Aquaman movie? 5/10
Animation Continued rugged animation style from JL: War is settling in. Action sequences are top-notch. 9/10
Sound Effects and Music I do remember hearing sounds. Were they good? Sure. I did enjoy the underwater SFX in Atlantis. 7/10
Captivity I enjoyed the movie for most of the ride, but often questioned what the heck was going on. 7/10
Overall awesomeness Throne of Atlantis was not the Aquaman movie the people wanted, needed nor deserved. 6/10
Creativity Whether you want to call it creativity or cop-out, there was a lot of tweaking to the source material. 7/10
Replayability  I would give this a second play-through, if only to see the fight scenes. 6/10
Special Features  Getting to know the history behind Aquaman’s most famous villains is the only gem.. 5/10
 
 
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IF YOU LIKED THIS, CHECK THESE OUT:

Batman: Brave and the Bold is an animated series in which Aquaman frequents. He may be a goof, but dude knows how to whoop some ass. Check out “Evil Under the Sea,” specifically.

The 2006 pilot for Aquaman (Mercy Reef), a CW series that was never picked up as a series; bad idea or just bad timing? It is available for download on iTunes and starred Justin Hartley.

Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox features an alternate version of Aquaman, one that becomes emperor of the seas, and engages in an apocalyptic war with Wonder Woman.

 

NEXT FOR DC ANIMATED:

With DC Animated decisive move to include more New52 continuity in their expanding universe, we will journey to a point right after the relaunch with  Batman vs. Robin. Last year, we got quite a bit of Batman, but this next one is going to come in with very high expectations. In an unrelated but totally related sequel to Son of Batman, Batman and the newly minted Robin will be going through some growing pains as the new Dynamic Duo. What I am most excited for is the animated debut of The Court of Owls and the Talons. From the previews, it seems as though this will be some weird blend of Batman: Court of Owls and  Batman & Robin: Born to Kill, the former of which features a killer who bonds with Damian by appealing to his time in the League of Assassins. Batman vs. Robin debuts on April 14th.

Written by Sherif Elkhatib

Best of 2014: Comic Books – Best Writer

Another year is in the books, and we here at Hush Comics couldn’t pass at the chance to rank our favorites of this year’s releases in all types of mediums. Some of the winners will surprise you; heck, some of the results surprised  us. The results are completely subjective, and therefore were chosen with infallible logic. We would love to hear your opinions on what we have chosen, or if you thought we missed anything. This should be a fun review before we gear up for 2015.

hush best of 2014
Click on the link to take you to the “Best of 2014” homepage.

Best Comic Book Writer

  • Geoff Johns – Superman (DC Comics), Justice League (DC Comics), Forever Evil (DC Comics)
  • Josh Williamson – NailbiterBirthright (Image Comics), Captain Midnight (Dark Horse Comics)
  • Matt Fraction – Hawkeye (Marvel Comics), Sex Criminals, Satellite SamOdy-C (Image Comics)
  • Rick Remender – Black Science, Deadly Class, Low (Image Comics)
  • Scott Snyder – Batman, Superman: UnchainedThe WakeAmerican Vampire (DC Comics), Wytches (Image Comics)

WINNER – Scott Snyder

Batman, Superman Unchained, The Wake, Wytches.  The man is a comic book writing machine.  And just because he writes a lot doesn’t mean his quality comes down either.  After all, he does have an MFA from Ivy League university Columbia; the man knows what he is doing. And he is making fanboys and fangirls around the globe very happy with his work.  – Adrian

Second Place – Josh Williamson

josh williamson writer nailbiter 7 best of 2014
Nailbiter #7

 

For me, 2014 was the year of Josh Williamson, and I’m pretty sure that’s exactly how he wanted it. He was previously known for GHOSTED, but in 2014 Williamson launched two new series both of which have been pretty darn well received by their audiences and critics. Nailbiter is one of the most original and psychologically terrifying horror books to come out in 2014, but Josh apparently wasn’t done there; he decided to break the mold for fantasy books as well when Birthright came out in October. Williamson has a great career in the world of comics, especially for being less than 30 years told, and his unique take to storytelling is no doubt a huge factor in his success. If you’re not a fan or simply haven’t read his books yet do yourself a service and pick them up now. You can thank me later by sending me a nice bottle of wine. Or cookies. – Keriann

Third Place – Matt Fraction

Hawkeye #17
Hawkeye #17

Sure, he looks like Harry Potter’s dad, but Matt Fraction would never make fun of a muggle. Fraction has put in some good work with Marvel over the years, but this year has been an exceptional year for him. With Sex Criminals, Fraction and artist Chip Zdarsky have pushed the boundaries of censorship, and his Hawkeye run has been one of the highest-grossing books Marvel has in its lineup. Both of those books have netted him an Eisner Award in 2014. Recently, he has been the writer of Ody-C, an outer space interpretation of Homer’s The Odyssey. If you’re ever bored, check out his Twitter page, where his display name is “butt stuff reindeer.” He’s kind of a weirdo, and I mean that in a good way. – Sherif

RUNNER UP – Geoff Johns

Superman #35
Superman #35

If there was a crown for most consistently badass comic book writer, it would go to Geoff Johns. He’s like a reckless magician, introducing amazing and interesting new characters, and then vanishing before they ever really get a chance to live up to their potential or be fully fleshed out. I wish Johns could just write Justice League and Superman forever (not to mention Green Lantern, a book which he ended his ten year run on last year). Where Johns really gets it right is that he sees and plans the big picture before we even see the first panel; there is a plot of planning – logical planning – that go into a Johns story, and where you end up is exactly where you were meant to, and whether or not you saw it coming, you can’t believe that nobody ever thought to do this before. – Sherif

RUNNER UP – Rick Remender

remender black science 6 best of 2014
Black Science #6

 

With a pen of righteous glory, Rick Remender has a thing or two he could teach other comic book writers.  This year Remender killed it this year with Black Science.  His masterful way of telling a single story through the eyes of many (with vastly different viewpoints) resulted in me giving standing ovations in the middle of my living room.  Each character he brought to the page had something new to offer.  No one character was driving this ship and that made for very memorable reading.  Remender also knows what it means to let a story drive a genre.  Black Science is all about multidimensional travel – very sci-fi heavy.  But if you were to read an issue with just text and conversation bubbles and all blank panels you’d probably find yourself just as intrigued and captivated.  That’s the sign of a truly good writer.  That’s why Rick Remender is Hush’s writer of the year. – Taylor

Next category: Best Comic Book Artist

Best of 2014: Comic Books – Best Story Arc

Another year is in the books, and we here at Hush Comics couldn’t pass at the chance to rank our favorites of this year’s releases in all types of mediums. Some of the winners will surprise you; heck, some of the results surprised  us. The results are completely subjective, and therefore were chosen with infallible logic. We would love to hear your opinions on what we have chosen, or if you thought we missed anything. This should be a fun review before we gear up for 2015.

hush best of 2014
Click on the link to take you to the “Best of 2014” homepage.

Best Comic Book Story Arc

  • DC Comics – Batman: Zero Year (Scott Snyder & Greg Capullo)
  • DC Comics – Batman: Endgame (Scott Snyder & Greg Capullo)
  • Marvel Comics – Spider-Verse (Various writers and artists)
  • DC Comics – Forever Evil (Geoff Johns & David Finch)
  • DC Comics – Multiversity (Grant Morrison & various artists)

WINNER – Spider-Verse (Marvel Comics)

 

I think it’s official. Spider-Man is my new favorite superhero. I can’t say that I actually ever had an original favorite. Being a fanatic Star Wars kid I don’t tend to focus on “superheroes” to often. I’ll tell you what though – the feelings I felt during the Spider-Verse events were synonymous to the feelings of watching A New Hope the first time. There were so many aspects that made the Spider-Verse event fantastic. The well-conceived plot, the intriguing villains, and clear & solid use of multidimensional travel all amplified the enjoyment of this event. But what made the Spider-Verse event “the best” all year long was getting to experience the vast variety of other-dimension Spider-Men and Spider-Women. Each issue hosted a new hero or gave us eye-popping insight into new worlds. The energy and creativity spawned from this event has been palpable. The event has been a ton of fun for fans and creators alike. The best part is that it’s not over. The first part of 2015 will keep the web-slingers busy as they try to survive the onslaught of the Inheritors. If the event maintains its awesomeness it may end up being the best of 2015. – Taylor

Second Place – Batman: Zero Year (DC Comics)

Batman zero year best of 2014
Batman #30

 

We know Bruce Wayne’s parents got shot, and we know that he did some stuff and then became Batman (Year One, mostly). But what the hell kind of stuff did he do to become Batman? Seems pretty important, right? Scott Snyder sure thought so. Zero Year is quite possibly the best Batman origin story I have ever read (Frank Miller, eat your heart out). Snyder and Capullo show they’re all in by paying homage to the original Bob Kane/Bill Finger lore – peep the stylish purple gloves – but still make the story their own by creating a whole new world. I was almost disappointed to return to the present, but then Endgame came along… – Sherif

Third Place – Multiversity (DC Comics)

Multiversity: Thunderworld Adventure #1
Multiversity: Thunderworld #1

How to even begin describing Multivesity? It’s Grant Morrison’s personal cosmology given comic book form using the shape of DC. Every month for eight issues, Morrison creates a new what-if in DC’s expansive universe, sometimes creating alternate versions of characters, new characters, or old characters in alternate situations. The only bummer is it’s eight issues instead of fifty-two. – Cuyler

RUNNER UP – Forever Evil (DC Comics)

Forever Evil #1
Forever Evil #1

As exciting as DC Comics can get, a lot of their ideas in the New52 are just recycled stories from the 70’s and 80’s. So when Forever Evil looked to be nothing more than a redo of Crisis on Infinite Earths, I set my phasor to “meh.” Right away though, I was hooked when they publicly revealed the identity of one of my favorite characters. It was another thrill entirely to watch the Justice League fight their way back from a very near edge of demise, and defeat a force so powerful that full repercussions haven’t even been felt yet. If you like alternate universe stories (like the new Spider-Verse, for example), then this story should be at the top of your list, too. – Sherif

RUNNER UP – Batman: Endgame (DC Comics)

Batman #35
Batman #35

It’s true that we don’t even know how Batman: Endgame will end, but I don’t care, it has been my favorite of the year.  Only three issues in, and it is the comic I look forward to every month.  The Joker’s pranks are absolutely chilling.  Batman isn’t as calm and composed as he usually is.  Gotham is going through a Joker-pocolypse.  Things look grim, but when a comic book can leave me on the edge of my seat, I’d say it’s a winner. – Adrian

Next Category: Best Creative Team

Comic Book Reviews 11-26-14

Review Scale:

The mythical A+: Classic comic book material. Belongs next to your copy of The Notebook and The Joy of Cooking.

A: Would definitely recommend to all comic book readers. Even more so to fans of the genre or characters

B: Enjoyable read. Fans of the genre or characters will especially like.

C: Non-essential read. Can be enjoyable for fans of the genre or characters, but likely for only one or two events in the books.

D: Unenjoyable book. Read at your own risk. Might find satisfaction if major flaws are overlooked.

F: Please don’t buy this book. Donate your money to a local comic book writer’s workshop instead to inspire future generations to write something better than this trash.

 

Pick of the Week:

Ody-C #1
Ody-C #1

Ody-C #1 – A

I’ve never read a Fraction book before, but if they’re all anything like Ody-C, I might have to start. In short, at its most perhaps offensively basic, Ody-C is a science fiction space opera gender swapped taking its the Odyssey. The book is full of crazy ideas feeling much like a Hickman book – like Pax Romana or the Manhattan Projects. The art is appropriately abstract, colorful, and French looking (think Moebius or Marvel’s Soleil line) to reflect that kind of story telling approach. The two coolest ideas come aboard the ship in which the captain (Odyssia, the gender swapped Odysseus) and her for co-captains must float in psychic in order to stear the ship, and her symphony that must reprogram space as they fly through it. The book is incredibly enjoyable and a lot of fun to look at, and I do highly recommend reading it. My only criticism is the source material: I know I’ve read the Odyssey at least three times in my college experience, as I’m sure any other liberal arts major has, and I found myself being too distracted at times trying to crack the gender code to be able to focus on what was going on. I guess I would have liked either a longer first issue or a more basic one just to get my footing before launching into the crazy stuff so that I could get a sense of what from the original Greek masterpiece mattered. – Cuyler

 

Other Reviews: 

Dark Horse Comics:

Alien: Fire & Stone #3 – B

One word – creepy! Creee-py!!! This series continues to be great and It continues to freak me out. However, some aspects are starting to get old and, for the first time since the Fire and Stone series began, I found myself a bit tired with the “mysterious black goo” ponderings. We’ve gotten plenty of examples of what this stuff is capable of and how horrific its effects are on any life form. This is a minor gripe overall, and it certainly doesn’t take away from the story. There’s only one issue left in the Aliens arch of Fire and Stone – this will effectively round out the prequel of the ongoing events. There’s plenty of action left to be had and a ton of mystery to be unraveled. After this many issues, I’m confident that Fire & Stone’s conclusion will be eerily fantastic. – Taylor

 

DC/Vertigo: 

Superman #36 – A

Wow, I can’t believe I am this excited about a Superman book. Geoff Johns has gotten me hooked on another superhero I have been skeptical about. Ulysses is finally coming clean about a secret he’s been keeping from Superman. Only, we still have to wait another issue to find out what it is! The reference to Brian Azzarello and Jim Lee’s For Tomorrow stands at the forefront as the best pat of this issue. Superman has since learned that while he is the strongest being on Earth, he still cannot cure disease, cannot control men’s urge for war. It’s some really deep stuff that I really feel deserved to be revisited here. Cheers to another knockout issue for Johns and Romita Jr.! – Sherif

Arkham Manor #2 – A-

After DC has spent the past couple months throwing new Bat-related titles to the wall, I think this could be one that has finally stuck. Arkham Asylum has fallen and Gotham has found the perfect place to house the criminally insane – Wayne Manor. To infiltrate the Manor and find out what is really going on, Bats has disguised himself as Jack Shaw, a John Doe criminal. Things take an interesting turn when it turns out he can’t protect the inmates anymore than he can the other citizens; hopefully he hasn’t bitten off more than he can chew. I love the originality of this series, and it immediately reminds me of Jeph Loeb’s The Long Halloween with the mysterious tone it takes. If you love Batman, or mystery, pick this book up while it’s still in its infancy. – Sherif

Futures End #30 – B-

That… was, surprisingly, not all that bad. I’m going to try to not get my hopes up, but I’m tempted to believe that this might actually go somewhere interesting. This week’s edition of Futures End focuses on one of the plot points that actually seems to matter so far. I’m dubbing this, “Attack on Cadmus Island” (Catchy, ain’t it?). Attack on Cadmus Island has everything I could really want: the action is great, decent art, and to top it all off actually moves the story forward! There’s even a couple of pretty great surprises in store for those who’ve been keeping up so far. To quote Big Barda, “….Did not see that coming.” – Moke

The Flash #36 – C

This trope may have been done before, but when future Barry Allen came to kill present time Barry Allen, things got a little mixed up. Now, they have swapped places… sorta. The Barry Allen from the future is now parading around like he owns the present time while the other Allen is stuck in some parallel dimension. Basically, the story is getting really convoluted, and the point I thought was the climax ended up just dragging the story out a little further. That being said, this future Flash is brutal and efficient, and willing to kill anybody he knows will upset things in the future. I’m not sure where this arc will go, but I can definitly stay on until I see what kind of awkward mess this is going to be for the present-day Flash to iron out.  – Sherif

 

IDW Entertainment:

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles/Ghostbusters #2 – A

Most 80’s kids have already imagined this team-up in their heads with toys, but still seeing it come to fruition is awesome! Crossovers are always kind of iffy, as the IDW X-Files one that crossed over with these two properties earlier this year was a little weak, but this one so far has been great. Seeing the banter between Donatello and Egon is exactly what I wanted it to be and the pairing of characters is perfect. The story has just barely gotten past the, “Ghosts don’t exist!” or “You’re a giant talking turtle!” things – which will obviously be there, but it still is setting up something good. The art is as good as you could ask in mixing styles and characters and, all around, this issue is must have for any 80’s kid or any nostaligia-loving enthusiast. – Jacob

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #40 – A-

The fight between the mutants of the series continues in this issue as we see the mutated animals battling the humans-turned-mutants, Bebop and Rocksteady. All this while, Casey helps out the O’Neils, and Donatello is off doing his own thing and may be going behind the turtles back to do so. All of which makes for a great issue of TMNT and although it seemed more to set up next year’s Mighty Mutanimals book, it still felt like a solid piece of the story and was a really enjoyable read. Santolouco continues to impress as the artist and it always brings a smile to my face to see Kevin Eastman contribute on an issue. – Jacob

Samurai Jack #14 – B+

Jack has been on a quite a journey recently since he lost his sword, which was the one thing that could defeat Aku and send him back to his time. In this issue we now see Jack being judged for losing such a weapon of power and whether or not he should be worthy of such a gift again or not. We don’t figure out whether or not they decide on this issue, but we reach a point where everything is on the line and Jack must act out with only his wit and no weapon. This story has been a very enjoyable read and I have loved the art of this whole series, as Tartokovsky’s style transfers so well to comics – which is why his other book, Powerpuff Girls, is so successful, as well. – Jacob

X-Files: Year Zero #5 – B-

This month’s Year Zero brings the story to an end and we finally get to see how the first case in X-Files history brought about what the X-Files is today. Despite being an interesting story and idea I think the execution was a bit wrong as I was never really into the story as much as I usually am when it comes to X-Files. It has a pretty cheesy ending over all and the different art styles for the modern and past X-Files teams makes me more interested in the series both I have not been a fan of most of the art coming out of X-Files as it just has way too may shadows. Ultimately I would say try and pick up this book to complete the series but over all this issue and mini series as a whole is one that will likely be forgotten in time and maybe even retold differently depending on the future of `. – Jacob

 

Image Comics:

Shadow Show #1 – A-

Shadow Show is not what I was expecting, but that ended up being okay. Initially, I was disappointed because the first page opens up and where I was expected something more fantastical and dark, I was greeted with warm artwork that was more reminiscent of a children’s book or Miyazaki movie. I’m not normally a fan of children’s book artwork in the comics I read, but as the story continued I realized what a great fit it really was. The adaptation of Joe Hill’s By the Silver Water of Lake Champlain was wonderful. The story is sweet and sad, and while the climax may have been a little predictable I was not left wanting. It had a great flow and to it and read really well. While it was a sad story, it still left me with happy feeling when I finished it. I’d definitely recommend this book. – Keriann

Rasputin # 2 – B

They say a picture is worth a 100 words. Whoever they is, they sure are right. Rasputin relies more on the art than it does on narration and dialogue. I’m a big fan for the way the storyline is unraveling itself between his history and the present. It feels organic and seamless and for a story steeped in so much mystery and magic, so the sort of timelessness really works well for the story. The use of red is brilliantly well-used. It’s a life force or death, but it’s the red the use of blood that’s really the narrator. It succeeds in a way that Trees kinda of fails. A lot of information and intrigue happens within panels of each other but while at the same time it doesn’t feel rushed. Rasputin is off with a Antoine to Verkhturye and to his ultimate destiny… (Insert maniacal laugher here.) – Jené

Trees # 7 – C

You can tell that Trees is gearing up to actually start – kinda of like the first act in a film; I think I’ve already said something similar about this storyline the last time I reviewed it. And it still seems that way. I think we only have to wait about two or three more issues until things really start coming to a head. At the moment, it still feels like there are too many characters and storylines; I want them to start weaving together more. I have my favorites and I’m bummed I can hang read more about the artist and the biologist more.  Still not all that sure where Ellis is taking the storyline, but, Transmetropolitan was amazing and I trust Trees is going to be just a good. He’s still doing something right if I’m glad to see Trees on the list to review. Overall, it’s an issues to get to a means. – Jené

American Legends #4&5 – C-

American Legends came to an end this week and it will not be missed. Overall the series just really missed the mark in my opinion. It never really hit that level of excitement I think it was striving for. It was campy as all hell, even through to the very end. The last panel concluded in such cheesy fashion I basically heard 80’s family sitcom music in my head while I read it. Now don’t get me wrong, the series wasn’t horrendous, it had its moments and it came with a really fun premise, it’s just that every week I felt this issues fell a little short and issues 4 and 5 were no exception. Davy, Sally and Mike’s adventure came to a close, naturally, and if anything it was poorly thought out, rushed, and a little confusing with a pretty boring climax. That’s what she said! Sorry, I couldn’t resist. The main problem with issues 4 and 5 really was that everything just felt rushed. Maybe it was supposed to be interpreted as nonstop action, but for me it didn’t read that way. It all just felt very choppy and hectic. I didn’t like that Paul Bunyan appeared to be a relatively normal sized man with a blue goat, instead of an ox. Johnny Appleseed was written like a no good dirty hippie, but was still probably the best character in the whole series. And apparently it is extremely easy to kill people with his apple seeds. I’m pleased that the series at least had fun and creative ideas, but sadly in my opinion it was mostly just a flop. – Keriann

 

Marvel:

Superior Iron-Man #2 – B+

I love me some good guys behaving badly. Tony’s acting like a bit of a d*** and I, for one, am thoroughly entertained. Extremis 3.0 is a hit, problematically so. Naturally, one of the more traditional hero-types comes to investigate (Not gonna lie: I didn’t even know Daredevil was in town) [Ed note: Daredevil relocated to San Francisco after his law license was stripped in NY for exposing his identity]. They fight. Hilarity ensues. Let’s be honest, although a bit morally ambiguous at the moment, Tony hasn’t fully crossed into villain territory. I find myself wondering what implications this might have on the Marvel U as a whole.  A**holishness aside, I think I could get used to this new Tony. Though it initially caught a lot of flak, Superior Spider-Man ended up being wildly popular, and I’m just itching to see the type of damage a Superior Iron-Man could cause. – Moke

Scarlett Spiders #1 – B

The Spider-Verse event has begun branching into smaller, varied events that focus on a few particular Spider-Men/Women. Scarlett Spiders follows the three primary cloned Spideys. They’ve been given the very important task of unveiling the secret behind the cloning capabilities of their pursuers, The Inheritors. I really enjoyed the set-up. The setting is gorgeous, the danger feel real, and the interaction between all the Spider-heroes is engaging. I can see the potential for the Scarlett Spiders series. My biggest fear is that it will become cluttered with non-essential and distracting characters. The level at which I’m invested in the Spider-Verse plot and chronology has made me a bit more impatient than typical; hopefully it won’t backfire on me! – Taylor

Spider-Man 2099 #6 – B

I’m all about all the Spider-Men and Women lately! The comic book world has been inundated with Spider-heroes of an infinite number of alternate realities and so far it’s all made for a great adventure. The plot in this series of Spider-Man 2099 maintains it original composition while weaving in the Spider-Verse happenings without making things seem too forced. This issue highlights multi-armed Peter Parker, Miguel O’Hara and (my favorite) May a.k.a. Lady Spider. It’s fairly apparent that the grand planners at Marvel are strategically placing certain Spider-Men in particular storylines. Each one has a specific role to play and thus far this has played out in a very exciting way. Spider-Man 2099 will be one of the branched series to really pay attention to. Their relation and interaction with Morlun is sure to be pivotal to every other arc.

All-New Ghost Riser #9 – D 

Ever since the end of the introductory arc of The All-New Ghost Rider I’ve been losing interest in the series. The first five issues rocked my world; it resulted in a high-set bar for the follow-up story. Filipe Smith (writer) has displayed a vast lack of creativity by essentially copying the plot from the previous arch. Dialogue is incredibly corny. Altered and added story elements are unbelievable and forced. The artwork is quite difficult to read. A lot of aspects are misfiring. The outlook is equally bleak. There aren’t a lot of opportunities for this series to improve – Smith has everything locked in fairly rigidly. To diverge now would feel awkward and unnatural. Our best prospects are to hunker down and wait for this all to pass. – Taylor

 

Funniest Panel:

Superior Iron Man #2
Superior Iron Man #2

 

Panel with the Most Awesomeness:

Superman #36
Superman #36

That about wraps it up for our reviews this week! Look for next week’s previews coming soon. Any comic books you didn’t see reviewed that you want reviewed? Any grades you didn’t agree on? Let us know in the comments!

All images taken from ComiXology app and the credit for them goes to the respective publishers; thanks to IDW Comics, image Comics, Dark Horse, Boom! Studios, Oni Press, Dynamite Entertainment, DC and Marvel for putting out great books.