September Comics and Collectibles Preview

At Hush Comics, we will be starting a new monthly piece reflecting on Diamond Comics Distributors’ monthly PREVIEWS issue. For those not in the know, PREVIEWS is a monthly magazine (almanac-sized each month) that shows you all the ways that you could lose your money through comics, collectibles and games. With the thousands of items to throw money at, we figure we’d make it a little simpler and suggest five comics and five collectibles that will definitely be on our shelves when they are released.

Comics & Books

1.) Fall of the Governor by  Jay Bonansinga and Robert Kirkman ($15 on Amazon) set to be released October 8, 2013. This is the third book in the Governor trilogy of The Walking Dead novels, and looks to tie-in to the comic book series, right around where the Governor meets his end (Spoiler!! He dies). With all the different storylines out there, it’s nice to see that something was created with the intent to supplement and not just making up content for kicks. In this novel, the entire story is told through the perspective of the Governor – a characteristic about the book I like most when considering that the story has always been told with the Grimes’ point of view. It will be interesting to see how others views them, especially The Governor. The first two books were some great literature, so I’m really excited for the final installment.

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2.) Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #28 written by Tom Waltz and drawn by Mateus Santolouco is the finale issue to the big “City Fall” arc that’s ongoing right now. It’s a crazy story that can only be made better by the addition to beloved baddies, Rocksteady and Bebop, as this marks their first fight with the Turtles. The big question on this is what happens to Leonardo as Shredder makes a power move to control the city’s underworld. The issue hits stores November 20, 2013. Count me in!

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3.) Batman: Zero Year tie-ins. It seems like every DC Comics book is either a tie-in to Batman: Zero Year or Forever Evil this month. While the massive amounts of books trying to become relevant by adding the Batman to their title, there are a few that really stand out and make me want to read them for content over marketing. The three titles that come to mind are Birds of Prey #25Green Lantern Corps #25 and Nightwing #25Birds of Prey #25 centers around Black Canary and her crime-fighting origin (the Nunchakus really did it for me). Green Lantern Corps #25 takes a look at then-Marine John Stewart as he grapples with confidence issues (not to mention saving a kid in a Gotham Rogues’ jersey! Nightwing #25 dives deeper into Dick Grayson’s pre-Bruce Wayne background; really, I’m just a sucker for a good Nightwing story. My expectations aren’t too high, but when they flood the market with crossover events, there are bound to be at least a few good ones, and hopefully I’ve picked them out. All issues come out November 2013.

Birds of Prey 25 GL Corps 25 Nightwing-25 (1)

4.) Super Graphic: A Visual Guide to the Comic Book Universe is a math/stat nerd’s dream book. I’m a big fan of graphs and charts. It’s full of information about all the superheroes and comic book characters. I think it will be refreshing because readers will get to see representation of the entire comic book world, as opposed to just Marvel or DC. Being a huge math nerd myself, I will probably spend hours compiling my own lists. It’s a pretty original twist on comic books that hasn’t been seen before, and at a low price, it’s worth hours of fun. In stores now, or $15 on Amazon.

Super Graphic: A Visual Guide to the Comic Book Universe.

5.) Harley Quinn #0 sounds like it could go either way. Written by Jimmy Palmiotti (Jonah Hex, Catwoman) and drawn by a bunch of different artists, including Art Baltazar (Tiny Titans), Darwyn Cooke (Justice League: New Frontier) and Tony Daniel. With no real momentum to go off of to start this series out, I’m curious as to where this is going to go. This series also marks the first solo series of Harley that isn’t using the 90’s Bruce Timm Batman Animates Series persona to base the character off of. This Harley will be more like the one found in the pages of Batman: Death in the Family and Suicide Squad. I’ve always been a huge Harley Quinn fan, so I will definitely check this out when it hits shelves on November 6th.

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Collectibles

1.) Batman: Hush Batman Kissing Catwoman Statue.

When I first heard that DC Collectibles was creating a foot-tall statue immortalizing the Jim Lee panel in Batman: Hush where Batman and Catwoman share a rooftop kiss, I immediately pre-ordered two. And if we could afford it, I would buy all 2500 limited edition statues because it’s just that damn cool. At $250 retail price, this is definitely for hardcore collectors only. However, the amount of detail put into the statue, from the cape flapping in the wind to the smoke rising in the dark, makes this one of the most well-done collectibles I’ve ever seen. I’m pretty excited to see this on the doorstep come February 2014.

Batman: Hush Kissing the Knight statue designed by Jim Lee

2.) Firefly Card Game

Whedon fans can continue their voyage on the Serenity in Toy Vault Inc.’s new Firefly: Out of the Black card game.  The game is descibed as a “co-op”  where players don’t compete against each other, but rather against the game itself.  Players take turns playing the roles of different Firefly characters to navigate through different events using their smarts.  If they make it through the mission without losing honor, they win.  If not, the game wins.  Sounds a lot like the world of Captain Mal already!  It sounds like an interesting concept.  For less than 30 bucks, it sounds like it is worth a play.

UPDATE: Apparently, this game was funded by Kickstarter, and the funds were canceled.  Toy Vault is planning a release for late October, but it is unknown if this will come to fruition.  We’ll have to watch Firefly repeats in order to live out our space cowboy fantasies until then.

firefly game

3.) Necessary Evil: Super-Villians of DC Comics, DVD and Blu-Ray

In a new documentary narrated by Christopher Lee (the 1958 Dracula, and Saruman in LOTR), interviews with some of the industries most renowned chronicle the backgrounds of DC’s villains.  Interviewees include Zack Snyder (300, Man of Steel), Guillermo del Toro (Pan’s Labyrinth, Hellboy) Kevin Conroy (the only voice of Batman that matters), Richard Donner (the 70’s Superman films, the X-Men film series), Geoff Johns (DC Comics writing god), and of course, Jim Lee (DC Comics art god).  The title pretty much says it all about the new film.  Due for release on Oct. 25th, it will surely be one to watch to hear about our favorite and not-so-favorite villains straight from the source.yvlmw8rz4mioo4p5lz2ve7eoa948knc1twjkxh97z8mal81srh1388zuilmomxter7ysvcaoz82q3vha-w370

4.) Pop Funko

The 1966 Batman Pop! Funko vinyls are here!  Doesn’t the Joker look like he could be your best pal?  And the eyebrows on Batman?  How cute!  Those are out on Oct. 3rd.  Also out soon are the Dia de los Muertos Nightmare Before Christmas vinyls. The Day of the Dead pattern and look has become very popular beyond the realms of the origin.  Jack and Sally look awesome!  It could almost call for a remake of the classic cartoon.  Jack and Sally are out now, but hurry, because they are going fast!

Batman 1966 Television Series DC Comics Pop! Heroes Vinyl Figures by Funko - Batman, Robin, The Joker & Catwoman NIGHTMARE-BEFORE-XMAS-FUNKO

5.) Wonder Woman Art of War Statue by Jim Lee

Based on the crisp art of Jim Lee, DC Collectibles is releasing the Wonder Woman: Art of War statue.  From the For Tomorrow Superman story arc, Princess Diana is sculpted by Clayburn Moore.  This statue shows the expertise of boy Lee and Moore’s artistry.  Wonder Woman’s face is feminine, which is rare, and she isn’t overly muscled, either.  The costume isn’t misogynistic and really shows that women can be pretty and tough.  Available for pre-order now and sure to be a fan favorite.

written by Sherif Elkhatib and Adrian Puryear

Graphic Novel Review – Batman: Hush

Graphic Novel Review: Batman: Hush

CollectingBatman #608-619

Original Release Date: 2002-2003

Publisher: DC Comics

Batman: Hush brings in the whole cavalry.
Batman: Hush brings in the whole cavalry.

Characters: Batman, Hush, Catwoman

Writer: Jeph Loeb (Batman: Dark VictorySuperman/Batman #1-26, Spiderman: BlueHulk: GrayDaredevil: Yellow)

Artist(s): Jim Lee (X-MenSuperman: UnchainedWildC.A.T.S.), Scott Williams & Alex Sinclair (inker and colorist, respectively, that work with Lee)

SCORECARD (each category ranked on a 10-point scale):

Storyline – 10
Art – 10
Captivity and Length – 10
Identity – 10
Use of Medium – 9
Depth – 10
Fluidity – 8
Intrigue/Originality – 10
The Little Things – 9
Overall awesomeness – 10

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DISCLAIMER: I will start this by saying that Batman: Hush is hands-down my favorite graphic novel ever. It’s the second graphic novel I ever read and, ultimately, what inspired me to delve deeply into the world of comics. I have two tattoos dedicated to what this book means to me and it’s part of the inspiration behind our name, Hush Comics. That being said, I will try not to blow too much smoke up your butts, because if you haven’t read it for yourself, I don’t want to ruin the experience.

Batman: Hush uses the entire spectrum of the Batverse to tell a sophisticated story about the emergence of a new cerebral villain into the Rogues Gallery and explores the quasi-romantic relationship between Batman and Catwoman. Hush also marks the return of one of Bruce Wayne’s wards, whose previous death marked his greatest failure as the Batman. It spans the length of twelve issues to tell its story, twice as long as traditional six-issue story arcs; with a plot as involved as this one, this allows Loeb space to create a non-formulaic, dynamic graphic novel. This is also a book that both seasoned comic nerds and people new to comics can be receptive to. Hush does a great job of not making you feel like an idiot because every scene portrays the adequate background information to understand what is going on – something that is the exception more than the rule in comics nowadays.

I always feel that writers of Batman books have an automatic leg up because the Batman of the last twenty years always has the answers, always knows what to do, and the writer usually coasts on it. Jeph Loeb takes the task one step further and helps you identify with the man behind the mask. You realize that Batman has been through a lot of trauma and stress, and although he’s the most badass superhero on the planet on the outside, he still struggles with the same things we do: who to love, who to trust, etc. This vulnerability is accomplished by a steady flow of personal monologue that narrates each panel with Bruce’s (sorry, spoiler?) inner thoughts. Each character, and there are a lot of them, has a distinct voice and personality. Long-time fans will also take note that the cast is scripted quite well. Nothing seems out of place or character in the writing and there is enough suspense to keep the reader from knowing what will happen next. The new villain is cunning and knows just where to hit Batman to make it hurt. This type of strategical villain with a large cast hasn’t been portrayed this well since Bane in Batman: Knightfall.

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The artwork from the legendary Jim Lee is what really won me over here. Jim Lee, now co-publisher of DC Comics, constructs vividly detailed panels that range from small transitional fight scenes to full-page beauties like the one below (Kissing the Knight). Lee’s team, Alex Sinclair, color, and Scott Williams, ink, add to the already beautiful pencilwork. The team switches up colors and even mediums throughout the book when it suits the mood, helping the reader transition between scenes. All of Lee’s drawings are crisp and have an edgy yet realistic appearance. With so much detail spent on each panel, Jim Lee and his team guide the reader through a completely immersive environment.

DC Comics Batman Hush Kissing the Knight B&W

Batman: Hush can be viewed as a stand-alone story, but fits in the old Batman continuity pretty nicely. Since launching The New 52 in 2011, DC has pretty much abandoned any continuation of the Batman-Catwoman romance (except for two awful smut-filled issues of The New 52 Catwoman) and there hasn’t been an appearance of Hush in any titles yet. Don’t let this discourage you from reading though, as there is tons of dialogue and events that coincide with other milestones in past Batman publications. There are a few different books written with Hush as the main villain, most notably Hush Returns and Heart of Hush, but these do not boast the big time writers or artists that this book does, and the story feels a little forced in the romance department, but it’s still a decent read. Overall I’d say that while it reads best as a stand-alone story, there are enough bat-nuances to make you want to get deeper into the Batman lore.

General Reception: You will find Batman: Hush on DC Entertainment’s Essential Graphic Novels list and it’s for good reason. An all-encompassing story that spans all of your favorite Batman villains, sidekicks and introduces enough new elements to tell a tale that both seasoned veterans and comic book rookies can all the same. The characters’ dialogue and actions seem familiar without giving away any of the plot twists throughout the book. There are a ton of different transitions in Hush, giving each scene a distinct ambiance by Jim Lee and his brilliant art team.

Related Books: Hush ReturnsHeart of HushFaces of Evil/Hush Money and Batman Beyond: Hush Beyond (kinda). Hush also makes appearances in videogames LEGO Batman 2 and Arkham CityBatman: Hush has recently been repackaged in Batman: Hush Unwrapped, featuring the sketch-work of Jim Lee. I wouldn’t recommend buying this version first, but if you read Hush the first time through and fall in love with Jim Lee’s art like I did, it’s a sensible purchase. Published in 2011, Absolute Batman: Hush is a completely over-sized version of the original with all its glory. It’s loaded with extras but it’s pretty pricey, so I wouldn’t recommend this unless you are a big-time collector or really love the story.

More by the writer: In terms of Batman books, Loeb has written acclaimed mystery crime graphic novels Batman: The Long Halloween and its sequel, Batman: Dark Victory. Loeb has also written Marvel books in the color-themed Daredevil: YellowSpiderman: BlueHulk: Grey and Captain America: White. He’s also worked on Superman/BatmanHulk and Cable series.

More by the artist: If you’re looking for more recent Jim Lee work, look to the first two New 52 Justice League story arc and the ongoing Superman: Unchained. His most distinguished works are X-Men: Mutant GenesisAlpha Flight and WildC.A.T.S., the latter being a series that he created when he left Marvel to help create Image Comics with the likes of Todd McFarlane, Rob Liefeld, and others.

Written by Sherif Elkhatib

Justice League Flashpoint Paradox Review

DC has no shortage of stories set in an alternate universe, with most of the play going to Infinite CrisisCrisis on Infinite Earths, and other Elseworld stories. So when Geoff Johns came out with the Flashpoint arc in 2011, fans were initially skeptical. Not only was Johns trying to reconstruct the DC comic lore, but he was doing it with Flash at the helm. While Barry Allen has been a staple character in the Justice League since his mid-1950’s induction into DC Comics, he remains out of the spotlight. The premise of the Flashpoint storyline is that, in a desperate move to change events in time to save his mother from being murdered, he taps into the Speed Force (it’s a long story; basically, the best way I can describe the Speed Force is an energy that the Flash can pull from to manipulate time… or some crazy shit like that), unknowingly creating a Butterfly Effect, saving his mother but putting himself right in the middle of a world war between Aquaman and Wonder Woman. Flash has found himself in a world without allies and without his powers. It’s a bit far-fetched of a story, but it really works out. So many questions about the DC Universe that begin with “What if” are addressed in the Flashpoint Paradox. What if Hal Jordan never was given a Green Lantern ring? What if Superman’s Kryptonian shuttle passed Smallville and landed in the hands of the government? What if Aquaman and Wonder Woman never got to interact with humanity before their rise to power? Maybe it’s just the fanboy in me, but there’s just something thrilling about not knowing what will happen next – an entire realm of new possible outcomes.

Everything that makes the book work shows up in the film. Foremost, the Flash is an excellent leading character. He’s charismatic, witty and is the one voice of hope in a universe full of darkness. Plus, he can run really fast. But really, it’s Flashpoint Batman that steals the show. Batman (who is not Bruce Wayne in this world) is one of the most rugged and dangerous characters I’ve ever seen. He’s missing the high-tech gadgetry, but he more than makes up for it by being a total badass. Even the President respects his gangster. The rest of the Justice League is also in full effect. Flashpoint Aquaman and Wonder Woman could easily hold their own movie. As the two juggernauts clashed, I almost forgot I was watching a DC Animated movie. Professor Zoom AKA The Reverse Flash AKA… (this could take a while; he has a lot of nicknames) … AKA Thaddeus Thawne plays a crafty villain that is obsessed with bringing down the Flash, even at the expense of destroying the world (Sheesh dude, get a hobby). He presents the perfect match for Flash, as he can manipulate the Speed Force to make it appear that he is going faster or slower. He’s the yin to Flash’s yang and they play off each other well.

I bet the first time The Flash and The Reverse Flash met, it was just like this.
I bet the first time The Flash and The Reverse Flash met, it was just like this.

The biggest note of discussion with this film is the decidedly adult nature it takes on. Not only is it darker than the comics it adapts from, but it is the darkest DC Animated film released yet. There are tons of violent deaths, and nobody is off-limits. It’s like I was watching The Wire. While some might see this as unnecessary, I feel that the violence and tragedy add to the gravity of the film. It’s not for the faint of heart, and definitely not a family-friendly movie, but the anime-style brutality made me feel more in touch with the characters and the stakes they were fighting for. The animation is complemented by nuanced changes in the storyline to make things fit more cohesively. Die-hard fans can tell, but there are several events that allude to several of the spin-off stories that come from Flashpoint, chronicling the stories of the Justice League in this alternate timeline from hell. On the other hand, though, some of the subtleties may fall off the deaf ears of many of the casual fans that look to these movies to learn more about comic books.

Overall, this is one of my favorite graphic novel movie adaptations that DC Animated has done. It has a solid storyline and a great voice acting cast to carry it throughout the amazing action scenes and large-scale thrills. Its mature content and subtle hints may turn off some casual fans, but do pay homage to the grave nature of the source material. If you want to broaden your horizons in the comic book world and aren’t afraid of graphic violence, this is the DC Animated film you have been waiting for.

 
SCORECARD:
Category Explanation Score
Plot One of the best alternate universe stories I’ve ever read, there are a few points in the film you can’t really understand unless you’ve read the source material. 8/10
Voice-acting An All-Star cast creates believable characters that carry themselves. 10/10
Representation of Source Material Flashpoint does a solid job of taking the source material and bringing it to life, keeping some of the most memorable moments intact. 10/10
Animation The hardcore and anime-like feel of the film fit the dark storyline. They also do a great job of making the Flash’s animations clean. 8/10
Sound Effects and Music Hero-certified music and cool time-warping sound effects fit the ambiance 8/10
Captivity Flashpoint is broken up into enough segments that it never feels like it’s as far along as it really is. 10/10
Overall awesomeness There is nothing about this film that does not kick total ass. 10/10
Creativity Even though it’s a remake of a graphic novel, the genius that is Geoff Johns crafted an amazing story that explores an alternate universe with no reservations. 10/10
Replayability I’ve seen the Flashpoint Paradox three times already, and there are more details to catch everytime 9/10
Special Features A feature on the Rogues Gallery, a scientific breakdown of the Speedforce and some great DC Vault episodes make this an excellent showcase of The Flash 10/10
 
 
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IF YOU LIKED THIS, CHECK THESE OUT:
Justice League: Doom (film)
 
All the Flashpoint books!
 
NEXT FOR DC ANIMATED:
Justice League: War will be DC Animated’s first New 52 movie and will reprise the first storyline of Jim Lee and Geoff John’s Justice League. All that I have on my wish list is that it’s animated by Jim Lee (I’m kind of obsessed with his art) and that I get to see the animated version of this. It’s already been released that Whedon alum Alan Tudyk is voicing Superman and DC Animated veteran Jay Oliva will be directing. Check out the teaser trailer at the link below.

Written by Sherif Elkhatib

Man of Steel Review

Movie Review – Man of Steel

Genre – Comic Book, Sci-Fi/Fantasy
Director – Zack Synder
Cast – Henry Cavill, Amy Adams, Michael Shannon, Russell Crowe, Kevin Costner
Alluring element – It’s Christopher Nolan’s Superman. That should be enough.
Check it out if you liked – The Dark Knight trilogy, The original Superman films, comic books

SCORECARD (each category ranked on a 10-point scale):
Plot – 9
Acting – 9
Representation of Genre – 10
Cinematography – 8
Effects/Environment – 9
Captivity – 8
Logical consistency – 8
Originality/Creativity – 7
Soundtrack/Music – 8
Overall awesomeness – 9

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I’ve hi-jacked the movie reviews to write about Man of Steel, the newest reboot of the iconic Superman character. After a wildly successful run in the late 70’s and 80’s with Christopher Reeves as Superman, the Big Blue Boy Scout has really had trouble getting any traction in a decent movie. After the forgettable Superman Returns in 2006, fans of comics and movies alike were excited to hear that this story would be the vision of the great Christopher Nolan, whose mind-blowing Dark Knight trilogy had breathed new life into the Caped Crusader and helped propel comic book movies back into the mainstream. As a disclaimer, I must say that I am, unequivocally, a Batman fan. I have always loved the internal struggle and have always related to heroes with tortured souls. For this reason, it has been hard for me to really enjoy Superman in comics and on screen, where seemingly the biggest problem he has is that he is just too plain awesome to fit in with normal people. Having got that initial bias out in the open, I really enjoyed Man of Steel. It’s a bad-ass action film, wrapped in some sci-fi and fantasy.

Man of Steel follows the formula of an origin storyline, but with plenty of Walking Dead-esque twists so you can usually guess but never really predict what will happen next. It’s a nice quality that I think even the biggest comic book hipsters can agree adds more to the experience than straight-from-the-pages adaptation would. Unlike the original film, which tried to stuff as much Superman knowledge as they could into it, there was decidedly less Super-stuff in Man of Steel. More than anything, main focus of the film is the identity crisis of Kal/Clark/Superduperman; having three names is enough to give anybody confusion about who they are. This adds an endearing quality to the film, as you can relate to childhood Clark as he puts up with bullies, notably “Dicksplash,” who makes multiple appearances throughout the film. It’s as a child that you really see the transparency of the Man of Steel. He wants to help people, he wants to fit in, and he goes on a long journey full of great short scenes to try to do so, but never really stays in one place long enough to make the audience feel a part of the experience.

In terms of acting, I think they really hit it out the ballpark on this one. Henry Cavill is the perfect Superman. He displays his emotions on his cape with a calm demeanor, much as Superman should. Lois Lane is portrayed adequately by Amy Adams (I still can’t believe they cast a redhead as Lane. The nerve! LOL) and Kevin Costner takes a break from Ocean Therapy Solutions to put on a good act as Jonathan Kent. What really stole the show was the great portrayal of Russell Crowe and Michael Shannon as Jor-El and Zod, respectively. Crowe plays Superman’s Kryptonian father in a capacity that we really hadn’t seen in this medium. It’s such a good performance that you almost forgive him for being in Man With the Iron Fists. Almost. Michael Shannon is great at playing total a-holes. From Revolutionary Road to Boardwalk Empire, Shannon has made me quite the fan, and he feels right at home with crazy ol’ General Zod. The only gripe I have here is that past the above-mentioned characters, nobody really has enough screen time to merit any attachment. The end of the movie left me wanting more Daily Planet, more Clark Kent as a child, more awkward childhood gaffes and more focus on the Kents. MORE MORE MORE. In a positive light, it gives the writers plenty to explore when the next installment comes out.

It might go without saying for a story that begins with a great civilization not listening to their eminent scientist when he says that the world is about to explode, but there are a lot of dumb choices made by a lot of different characters throughout the movie. At the beginning of the movie, Lois Lane says, “I get writer’s block if I’m not wearing a bulletproof vest.” This cannot be more true as she is always putting herself right in harm’s way, screaming and falling and I’m sick of it. Where is feisty Lois Lane? Why is she so easily knocked off her game? Johnathan”Pa” Kent also makes some poor choices, in action and words, that seem out of character. Remember in the commercial trailers, when Clark asks whether or not he should have let those kids on the bus die, and Pa responds with, “Maybe?” Yeah, well there’s really no more extent to that conversation… Ma & Pa Kent are the entire reason for Clark’s moral compass; why marginalize that to focus on the fact that he’s alone and misunderstood? And how can you choke a Kryptonian if they don’t need Oxygen to breathe? You can’t, but they do it anyway. Because it’s cool.

If you’re a fan of subtle gestures, there are Easter-eggs galore here. Somebody did their homework! LexCorp trucks, a peak at the fortress of solitude, along with a nod to the ridiculous product placement of the original film (and many other neat details) all add up to a film that really lets the fanboys feel like they’re appreciated. One great fire-starting dialogue I’ve wanted to start is the topic of gender-roles in comics. Since their New 52 launch a couple years ago, DC Comics apparently has an agenda to reboot more characters that were traditionally male as females. I’m not saying this is a poor choice, but it only works when those female characters have an impact. Case in point,  Jenny Olsen. Jimmy Olsen has long been Lois Lane’s protégé/lackey in the comics, television shows and movies. He’s full of corny “gee-golly” and “oh boy” banter, but not in this movie. In this movie, he is a she, and she adds absolutely nothing to the film. If we’re changing characters from men to women to make a point, then make a point! Another theme I found in the movie, which was not so subtle, is the comparison of Superman to Jesus Christ. Lost son, performer of miracles, incredibly good hair. I don’t want to spoil anything about the film, but it could perhaps explain why Superman can be such a difficult character to relate to. I feel like it’s their way to really start the conversation of religion in comics. To sum all that nonsense up, it’s clear that Man of Steel has more to say than what the dialogue suggests and the subtleties make it an enjoyable film multiple times.

The fight scenes are grand in scale, totaling Smallville and Metropolis in ways that, as an adult, really have you wondering, “Now who is going to pay for that??” Especially enjoyable about the action in Man of Steel is the ability to make the fights look like super-humans fighting, with lightning quick movements and earth-shattering hits. As a result of this, the height of the fight scenes can look like a cluttered CGI mess at times. The cameras during the movie are very shaky, likely to help synthesize the fast and loud nature of the film. This can be a bit of a distraction from the events of the film, or even cause a bit of motion sickness if you have to sit at the front of the theater. Overall, the cinematography is jaw-dropping. Kandor (the capital of Kryton) looks like it belongs in Naboo. And don’t even get me started on Jor-El’s cool ride; it’s a freaking butterfly-dragon! I also love Zod’s force in their legitimately frightening Helghast-like masks and the “YOU ARE NOT ALONE” PSA had me about to fall out of my seat.

For the first time in a long time, I truly felt like I was seeing an origin story. A brand new spin on a character I felt going in that I knew so well. While I won’t be trading in my cowl for rimmed glasses anytime soon, I definitely can revel in the fact that another sensational comic book movie has been released. While I have my personal bleats about what makes a Superman story, I love Nolan’s interpretation of The Man of Tomorrow and I think a Justice League movie would look great with Henry Cavill leading the way. Please go see this impressive film!

Written by Sherif Elkhatib