SDCC 2015 – Sherlock Christmas Special Teaser Released

Following the poster release of the much anticipated Sherlock Christmas Special, a brand new teaser was shown at San Diego Comic Con. From deerstalker to snowy streets to silly facial hair, the teaser would make any Sherlock fan tremble with excitement. The teaser shows that while the special will take place in Victorian times, it still holds much of the same modern, British wit the show is known for. It also seems to be poking fun at itself with Watson’s mustache as well as calling out some of the original text’s sexism. Mrs. Hudson objects to Watson’s depictions of her as a simple housemaid in his stories, arguing with him about it as they enter the house. While fans still have two odd years until series four, this teaser for the soon(ish) Christmas special is a good way to combat the hiatus blues.

Unfortunately, show stars Benedict Cumberbatch, Martin Freeman, Mark Gatiss and Andrew Scott weren’t able to make it to the convention. Cumberbatch is tied up with playing Hamlet in London, Scott is working on “Spectre 007” and rumors are that Freeman is filming on the next Marvel-related flick. However, Scott, Cumberbatch and Gatiss sent their love and apologies through a witty video.

The Christmas special will be shown in select theaters across the globe alongside its Television release, a smart move given how long the episode will be (90 minutes.) Sherlock always feels more like a mini movie anyway, so it’s no surprise the BCC is finally giving it the large screen it deserves.

Stephen Moffat gave a few hints at the Sherlock panel at SDCC about the fourth series coming out in 2017 saying, “We know very clearly what stories we’re doing for the next season… and the never-stop-crying cliffhangers.” He also said that series four of Sherlock will include even more emotional turmoil for fans who can expect to be “sucker punched into emotional devastation.” He said this with a big smile on his face, which can only mean one thing. Grab the tissues. Gather the alcohol. Prep your ice cream scoops. We’re in for it.

Videos belong to the BBC and Andrew Scott. Feature photo by www.mirror.co.uk.

BBC Sherlock Teaser Poster Goes Back In Time

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Photo by The BBC.

Sherlock fans get excited! The end of hiatus is approaching. BBC released a photo yesterday teasing the Sherlock Christmas Special that will be released this year. While there are no specifics yet, fans have known for some time now that the special will take place in Victorian London, hence the time period garb. The special will be a stand alone 90 minute episode, having no canonical connection to the main, modern series. Doctor Who jokes aside, things are looking good for the Sherlock fandom right now.

Benedict Cumberbatch and Amanda Abbington on set.
Benedict Cumberbatch and Amanda Abbington on set.

“We’re really proud of it, we think it’s a real cracker. But that’ll be it until series four,” Stephen Moffat told the BBC and admits that he and Mark Gatiss haven’t started working on series four yet. Last series left Sherlock fans with a major cliffhanger and much to be awaited. The long anticipated series is due to return in 2017 and while the special doesn’t have date yet, it is likely to be released sometime around Christmas. Until then, enjoy all the Victorian goodness and look out for the inevitable AU fan fiction that will come out of this.

 

Parallels in Fandom: Partially Deceased Syndrome VS Post Traumatic Stress Disorder; What “In The Flesh” Has to Teach Us About the PTSD Stigma.

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Kieren Walker (Luke Newberry) Photo courtesy of the BBC

“I am a Partially Deceased Syndrome Sufferer and what I did in my untreated state was not my fault.” – Kieren Walker

In the post-apocalyptic world of the small (and recently canceled) BBC show In the Flesh, zombies have been renamed “Partially Deceased Syndrome Sufferers.” Through medication they have returned to their original state, memories intact. On paper, they have their old life back, placed back into their family homes, able to live the way they did before they rose from the grave. But in reality, things aren’t quite that simple. Living citizens are still angry over the deaths PDS sufferers caused in their untreated state, and in small towns like Roarton, being partially deceased could get you a bullet in the brain. Neighbors are terrified of PDS sufferers’ medication wearing off and that if it does, they’ll “go rabid” and return to being dangerous zombies. Most citizens want them out of their town and use the derogatory slur “rotters.” PDS sufferers are forced to wear makeup and eye contacts to hide the fact that they aren’t living anymore and the stigma is down right life threatening.

While In the Flesh is not the most popular show, characters like Kieren and Jem have a lot to teach us about Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and the stigma surrounding it. In just the first three minutes of the first episode, Kieren is shown having vivid, disturbing flash backs of the people he killed when he was in his untreated state. These flash backs continue throughout the show and Kieren becomes depressed over his inability to control them and the government’s lack of care.

Those who suffer from PTSD frequently have vivid flashbacks and nightmares of the trauma they’ve endured. Like Kieren, they can’t let go of the events that happened to them. PTSD sufferers often grapple with suicidal ideation, similar to how Kieren feels during the show. His sister points out that he “can’t kill himself twice” alluding to the way Kieren died in the first place. Feeling guilty for his actions, Kieren grapples similarly to those with PTSD.

Jem, Kieren’s younger sister, is a veteran who fought untreated PDS sufferers in the Human Volunteer Force (HVF) during the zombie outbreak or “the rising” as it’s referred to on the show. As the show continues, we find out that Jem is suffering from flashbacks, nightmares, and extreme feelings of guilt and anxiety. She shows all the symptoms of PTSD and with no tools to help her transition into civil society again, her anxiety just keeps getting worse. It doesn’t help that one of the people tied up in her guilt happens to be her brother, a PDS sufferer she couldn’t bring herself to kill during the rising.

Jem Walker (Harriet Cains) Photo courtesy of the BBC

Studies show that 1 out of every 9 women will develop PTSD in their lifetime. This makes them twice as likely as men. While Jem suffers because of her time in the HVF, this number is likely higher because 1 out of 6 women in the US will experience an attempted or completed rape at some point during their life. The stigma around PTSD is focused on veterans, but many people forget that rape victims make up a large portion of PTSD sufferers.

One fear that the living have about PDS sufferers is that if their medication wears off, they will return to their untreated state and become violent. The stigma around PTSD sufferers is very much the same. Especially with veterans, many people believe that PTSD sufferers are violent and will lash out at any moment. With the April shooting at the Fort Hood military base in Texas, this stigma has only deepened. Suspected of having PTSD, Ivan Lopez injured 16 and killed 3 before killing himself. While Lopez was being evaluated for PTSD,  there was never a diagnosis. Despite there being no concrete evidence of Lopez having PTSD, many people believe he did and have therefore attached the diagnosis to violence.

Ivan Lopez, Photo courtesy of Fox News Latino

However, the opposite is true. PTSD sufferers are no more potential to violence than anyone else. Blogger and PTSD sufferer C.J. Grisham writes, “I get extremely nervous in crowded situations and become hypersensitive to my surroundings. Before entering any building, I make a quick survey of all people around me and seek out any and all exits. I sit with my back to a wall so I have a good view of people approaching me. I get startled and anxious at unexpected and loud noises. What I don’t get is violent. What I don’t do is threaten people.”

Clinical Psychologist and Military Researcher, Herrera-Yee says of PTSD sufferers that “you’re more likely to see it as someone who is withdrawn, anxious and numb, who’s lost interest in life. Some veterans explain it to me this way: ‘The last thing you want is to go out and lash out.’” Despite this, the stigma of violence still remains, much like the stigma surrounding PDS sufferers. Kieran is small, and soft-spoken. He spends much of his time inside, avoiding people because he is ashamed of what he did. He takes his medication daily and is probably the least likely to lash out or go rabid. In fact, when *SPOILER* forced to go rabid by being subjected to the pill “Blue Oblivion,” he attempts to tie himself to a grave to keep himself from hurting anyone. It isn’t the PDS sufferers who are most likely to lash out, but the living surrounding them who treat them like second class citizens and want them out of their town by any means necessary.

While having PTSD isn’t quite as obvious to the untrained eye as the living dead, the stigma is still very similar. No one is threatening to gun down anyone who has PTSD, but the same fear is still very much there. Similar to Kieren having to hide his condition with makeup and eye contacts, many PTSD sufferers feel they cannot talk about their disability for fear of judgement and many feel ashamed for having it in the first place.

PTSD is a serious issue with a terrible stigma surrounding it. People who don’t understand PTSD (or don’t care to) can be afraid of people who have it. It’s important to educate the public about this disease because with knowledge comes acceptance. By using In the Flesh as a teaching tool, we may be able to get rid of the misconceptions surrounding PTSD.Though the show has been canceled, its messages are still important. Like Kieren, many PTSD sufferers are very much harmless and deserve our love and respect. 

For more information on PTSD and its treatment, please visit http://www.ptsd.va.gov/ for veteran focussed PTSD and http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd/index.shtml for general information about the disorder.

Cover photo and video courtesy of the BBC.

“Respect My Craft” – Peter Davison

In this consumer-based industry, it can be easy to forget the years of hard work that the people in the business put in. Behind every panel, it takes a skilled writer, artist, inker and colorist to make the product complete. Behind each scene goes hours of preparation. Hush Comics’ weekly article “Respect My Craft” will dive into the history of these comic book and pop culture greats that will hopefully give a new perspective on how the men and women behind the pen (or stylus) contribute to the collective awesome-ness of the nerd world, or at least give you a reason to invest in their work.

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Click on the link to take you to all of our Denver Comic Con 2014 “Respect My Craft” articles

 

Name: Peter Davison aka Peter Moffet

Profession: Actor

Notable Work: Doctor Who, Law & Order: UK, All Creatures Great and Small

“I felt that I had found my home when I did television for the first time, because I felt I understood it. I can’t figure out why that was, but I sort of knew when the camera was on. Things like that seemed to have a certain degree of instinct.”Peter Davison

 

Peter Davison (or Peter Malcolm Gordon Moffet as he is known outside the entertainment industry) is best know as the fifth Doctor from the classic series of Doctor Who, but he has graced the small screen – or at least British television for many years. Before getting his first role in The Tomorrow People in 1975, Davison was trained in acting at The Royal Central School of Speech and Drama in London. He had his first stint of acting while also being the assistant stage manager for the show, Love’s Labour’s Lost, at Nottingham Playhouse where he chose to change his stage name to Peter Davison because of the actor and director known as Peter Moffatt (who he himself directed seven Doctor Who serials for BBC). He thought that although they had different spellings, it would be too confusing to people.

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Peter went on to appear in a couple roles on television including an alien named Elmer for The Tomorrow People and Tom Holland for Love for Lydia, which led him to catch his big break by being cast as Triston in All Creatures Great and Small which is based off of the books written by the famous country vet, James Herriot. Davison starred in 65 of the 90 episodes made up until 1990 on top of the fact that he gained two other recurring roles as Russell Milburn and Brian Webber on sitcoms Holding the Fort and on Sink or Swim, respectively. The role on All Creatures Great and Small got him the major attention and it was even the main reason he had the role of the cow, Dish of the Day, for the classic The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy miniseries due to him playing a vet and the producers thought it would be funny to have a famous veterinarian play a cow.

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At this point, he was established as a very successful television actor and it was his next role of the fifth Doctor in Doctor Who which garnered him the acclaim that most people would know him for. He carried this character for three years lasting 70 episodes before his iconic cricket outfit with a piece of celery on his lapel passed on the Doctor torch to the patchwork jacket of Colin Baker’s in 1984.

During the Christmas following this run, he had a daughter, Georgia Elizabeth, with his then wife Sandra Dickinson. Oddly enough, Georgia would grow up to star in an episode of the revived Doctor Who in 1998, playing who else but the Doctor’s genetically created daughter. During the filming she fell in love with David Tennant, who was the Doctor at the time; the two got married, making the fifth Doctor’s actual daughter and the tenth Doctor’s genetically created daughter the actual tenth Doctor’s wife. Yeah, I know it is kind of confusing, but that is what you get with the wibbly wobbly timey wimey complications of Doctor Who. Davison actually also appeared in two shorts after his run on the official show for the charity Children in Need: one in 1993, titled Doctor Who: Dimensions in Time and another in 2007 called Doctor Who: Time Crash where he met the tenth Doctor as the fifth Doctor, all the while not knowing that he was actually meeting his future son-in-law.

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As far as more Doctor Who, he was not included in the 50th anniversary special as it only included the tenth and eleventh Doctor, a prequel short that had the eighth Doctor and a cameo by the fourth Doctor, but he did write and direct a wonderful short for the fans, which featured a large amount of people who were not included in the special and of course some who were as well. The short was titled The Five(ish) Doctors Reboot which focused on Peter Davison, Colin Baker, and Sylester McCoy trying to figure out a way to be featured in the 50th anniversary special.

Through the years after his initial Doctor Who run, Davison has tried theater, radio and different films – including a run as King Arthur in the musical Spamalot! based off of the film Monty Python and the Holy Grail and as Professor Calahan in Legally Blonde, the musical. A lot of his radio experience can be connected to Doctor Who as well as Big Finish production creates many audio plays that continue the adventures of past Doctors so that we can all have a little bit more of each Doctor. Although he has tried all these different venues, Davison always seems to find his way back to the television screen, where he feels he truly belongs. He made a couple returns to All Creatures Great and Small through the years as well as playing Clive Quigley in Ain’t Mibehavin, David Braithwaite in At Home with the Braithwaites, George Huntley in The Complete Guide to Parenting, Martin Chadwick in Fear, Stress and Anger, DC Davies in The Last Detective, and most recently as Michael in Pat & Cabbage, and Henry Sharpe in Law & Order: UK with fellow Doctor Who alum, Freema Agyeman.

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None of the media in this article belongs to Hush Comics; it all belongs to their respective properties (BBC, NBC Universal Television). Join us tomorrow as we continue our countdown to Denver Comic Con with DC Comics editor and writer of Batman and Robin, Peter Tomasi.