The Hunger Games: Catching Fire Review

Genre – Dystopia, Fantasy, Scif-fi, Action, Book-to-Movie Adaptation
Director – Francis Lawrence (Constantine, I Am Legend, and no relation to Jennifer Lawrence)
Cast – Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Liam Hemsworth, Woody Harrelson, Elizabeth Banks, Lenny Kravitz, Donald Sutherland, and Philip Seymour Hoffman
Alluring element – It’s based off the best book in The Hunger Games trilogy, Philip Seymour Hoffman
Check it out if you liked – The Hunger Games franchise, any survival movie ever.
Plot – 9
Acting – 8
Representation of Genre – 10  
Cinematography – 9
Effects/Environment – 9
Captivity – 10
Logical consistency – 8
Originality/Creativity –  8
Soundtrack/Music – 10
Overall awesomeness – 10

hush_rating_91
Hey Girl, have you seen Catching Fire yet?
Hey Girl, have you seen Catching Fire yet?

As I rated The Hunger Games: Catching Fire and argued my points for my rating scale, I realized that my high scores are coming from a biased fan-girl prospective.  That being said, Catching Fire was the most enjoyable movie I have seen since Star Trek: Into Darkness.  Was it as great as the book?  Well, is any movie as good as the book it was adapted from?  Catching Fire is arguably the best book of author Suzanne Collins teen-based dystopian trilogy.  I had very high expectations going into this film and felt greatly rewarded *gush*.

Our Heroine and her crew dressed for The Capitol
Our Heroine and her crew dressed for The Capitol

Catching Fire continues to follow the story of the winner of the Hunger Games, Katniss Everdeen and the aftermath of winning the Hunger Games, particularly because of the way she won, by defying the rules of the Hunger Games and offering to kill herself with her televised lover and District 12 partner, Peeta Mellark, rather than be forced to kill him herself.  If this is too confusing for you, you may want to go back and either read the first Hunger Games book or watch the movie as the sequel does not include much explanation from the original story.  The consequences of winning the games is on par with actually being in the games.

Many of the reasons I am so fond of this movie is because of the clear differences between it and the first film.  First off, no more motion sickness camera.  Throughout the first film, I found myself having to constantly close my eyes or else get sick.  With a new director on board, the jiggly first-person camera went away.  We also lost the amount of dramatics the Peeta/ Katniss (Peeniss) relationship had going.  The first film made their relationship so awkward it was uncomfortable to watch.  I can see the argument that the reason for that was because the two had to make “a show” for the viewers from the Capitol to be interested enough to send them gifts, thus making it easier to survive, but I also think that the “love” between the two was a ploy to keep the Twi-hards of the moment involved with the story.  In Catching Fire, the forced love was a ploy for the real audience, but was better acted as ploy for the people of the Capitol.  It was also better demonstrated by the heart-to-heart President Snow had with Katniss at the beginning of the film about her relationship with Peeta vs. Gale.  Once Katniss and Peeta ***SPOILER*** enter the games again, Katniss has genuine feelings about Peeta’s well-being and shows it better than she did the last time they almost died together.

There were many little moments that really made the film amazing for me.  At one point President Snow asks his young granddaughter when she started wearing her hair in a braid, to which she says that all the girls at school are doing it.  It is such a small and quiet scene, but the acting by the wonderful Donald Sutherland is enough to make it extremely significant.   The dress Katniss wears, made by Cinna, to reveal as the beautiful bride turned Mockingjay aka The Face of the Rebellion is also noteworthy.  When she raises her arms to reveal the wings, it culminates what readers of the book would have wanted to see.

Do they make that in my size, please?
Do they make that in my size, please?

The portrayal of the edgy victor, Johanna Mason, played by Jena Malone, was very well done.  She is questionably loyal to Katniss, but proves herself worthy at the end.  And she is an actress I have followed since she was a child, so it was cool to see her play a sexier, older role.  The change in Effie Trinket is also nice to see.  She is still all about the fashion of The Capitol, but is also very dedicated to the “team” from District 12 and is genuinely sad about the bad things that happen to each of her victors.  The relationship between newcomer, but resident victor, Finnick O’Dair, played by Sam Claflin and his pseudo-mother, Mags, is really moving during their scenes in the arena.

Look at that... Trident.
Look at that… Trident.

Another note about Finnick is that he is the Aquaman of this universe, and the trident is officially cool because of it.  And despite the outfit he is forced to wear to the tribute tour, he is damn sexy.  The segment featuring the training arena also did an amazing job of showing how strong Katniss is.  She performs at top speed while practicing her archery skills.  She then shows the Game Makers her amazing skill (although not archery) during her solo evaluation.  They also touched on the gratuitousness of the Capitol people who eat and then throw up just to eat more.  The Game Maker’s room and the translation of that room to the actual arena was visually stunning.

Oooh, Shiny.
Oooh, Shiny.

It is rare when a film can capture the imagery of a book’s description so well.  The arena is beautiful and the technology behind it is just as intriguing.

Hey ther, creepy Career.
Hey there, creepy Career guy.

More importantly, the Game Maker himself, Plutarch Heavensbee, is so expertly acted by Philip Seymour Hoffman that he is reason I give the film an “A” rating.  I call in the Hoffman offset.  He is so intriguing and easy to hate that the twist at the end is even more shocking when the audience finds out his true nature.

Of course there were moments the movie missed.  They could have been included as small allusions, as many other great moments were.  It seems like at this point we should know how Haymitch won his games considering he is mentoring our two heroes, he is a complete drunk mess, and that ***SPOILER*** he is revealed to be the one who is creating the rebellion and stamping Katniss’ face on it.  The way Haymitch won his game is at the least slightly important to this story.  Also, despite the detail of the solo presentations by both Peeta and Katniss, it is never mentioned in their interviews with Caesar Flickerman what their final scores were from those presentations.  It’s small, but I think worth nothing since it was a major scene in the first movie.  Before the victory tour starts for Katniss, she discusses running away in the woods with Gale.  In the book, she actually does run for a short while and finds other people who are also on the run.  The movie was already a bit on the lengthy side, so it may have been purged because of time constraints, but it could have been an interesting addition to the film’s depth.  And lastly, I’m putting it out there, why the hell does Peeta still have his goddamn leg?!  For gods sake, it was cut off in his first tour, and if they didn’t have the guts to do it for the first film, this could have been their film.  But no, its still there. and honestly, when Peeta is on the screen, I just stare at his legs with bated breath waiting for a random meat cleaver to come swinging from the jungle trees and chop it off.  Perhaps they will save that for the last movie, but I’m starting to think its never to going to happen.  Sigh.

The brutality in Catching Fire  is worth noting.  The games themselves are brutal, of course.  The Careers are brutal, of course.  But it is the commentary on the Government and the Peace Keepers enforcement of the peace that is particularly striking.  When the people start showing signs of rebellion during the Victory Tour and during The Reaping, Peace Keepers oddly do exactly the opposite to keep the peace.  There are some very hard scenes to watch because of the violence that occurs on the people in the districts.  It is particularly shocking because of the juxtaposition of the dystopian society and the society we live in today.  One scene shows a very brutal and bloody whipping of one rebel and may be a bit much for little ones.  At the same time, it is was great to see, not because I’m a sick person, but because this movie is far from a love triangle, but rather the story of a people who are trying to make a better world because the one they live in is so controlled and the lengths those people are willing to go to accomplish that.

Katniss steps in between the rebel being whipped and the Peacekeeper.  What a brave girl!
Katniss steps in between the rebel being whipped and the Peacekeeper. What a brave girl!

As a final caveat, I just have to talk about Jennifer Lawrence’s cry face.  I’m not usually one to talk about how people’s faces look, because its just not nice, and I adore Jennifer Lawrence.  But her cry face is just awful.  And I say that with full confidence that the cry face she constantly wore during the film is not her true cry face, but the face she made especially for this film.  Katniss cries all the time in the film.  And I feel that she was justified in crying most of those times because she is put in so many positions that we would all cry.  But the thing about Katniss is that she is supposed to be the Face of the Rebellion because she is different from previous Tributes.  She is emotionally stronger and more skilled than the others that preceded her. From a feminist standpoint, it was a little annoying to see this strong-willed, smart young woman be taken down a notch by her overwhelming use of emotion and make her the weaker sex because of it.  I still think Katniss is a better heroine that most teens in today’s pop-culture, but the film made her more delicate than she was portrayed in the books.  That being said, with all the other social commentary going 0n, it may have been hard to relate to her by making her cold to her surroundings.  The world isn’t quite ready for the full effect of Katniss Everdeen, the kick-ass teenager who changes Panem, but Catching Fire did a fine job of preparing us for those changes and the girl who will lead that rebellion; the Girl on Fire.  Until next time, May the Odd be Ever in Your Favor.

written by Adrian Puryear

Published by

Adrian Puryear

Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Joss Whedon, and Breaking Bad are the best things to ever happen to me. I'm only a Three on MeowMeowBeenz. I really want to be a Four.

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